I wanted to reblog this partly because it’s good – in my view – to see more people writing about REF. I also think the post makes some interesting points. I think REF is horribly flawed, but maybe we have to also realise that self-regulation also has its problems. I would suggest that self-regulation might be the wrong term to use. Not all of our research money comes through REF. A big fraction comes through research grants that are competitive and are assessed by a reasonably knowledgeable panel (although I would suggest that the allocation of research council grants in the UK has its own problems). REF is essentially allocating QR money that goes – in the first instance – to the university, not to individuals. The university then decides how to divide this money up. It’s not clear to me that a simpler assessment exercise that used up less time, was less easy to game, and in which maybe the allocation was less non-linear (i.e., a weaker dependence on how well you do and how much money you get per person submitted) would be just as effective and less damaging. Part of me thinks that maybe the criteria should be secret until the process is finished, but I suspect many would feel that they then wouldn’t trust it at all and everyone would complain afterwards if they didn’t do as well as they thought they should have done.

Corticalia

When I was a medical student we were encouraged to conduct vaginal examinations on anaesthetized gynaecological patients, so that we could learn how to examine the reproductive system in a relaxed setting. The women did not know this was going to happen to them during their surgery, and did not sign any consent forms. Probably they would not have minded anyway (they were asleep after all, and educating the next generation of doctors is undoubtedly a good cause) but the possibility that they should be asked if they did mind did not occur to anybody, until my ultra-feminist friend kicked up a stink and organised a rebellion. The surgeons were genuinely surprised and mystified. Being well-meaning, it had not occurred to them that some people might see what they were doing as wrong.

Fast-forward a few years to the Alder Hey scandal, in which it emerged that doctors at a children’s hospital had…

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